Bibliography of Environmental Social Work References:

In the following pages you will find almost 300 bibliographic citations to journal articles, conference papers, books, book chapters, dissertations, master's theses, policy statements and reflective essays written by social workers and/or included in social work or allied publications. Many of the authors are from North America but you will also find social workers from Australia, England, New Zealand and India who address the critical interconnection between social work and environmental issues. The publications cover a variety of topics ranging from the highly theoretical to the very practical and applied. They span a period of time from the early 1970s through 2011. There are several which date from an even earlier era when social work was just beginning to seriously consider the influence of environmental factors on human well-being. Some of topic areas include: climate change and global warming, history and theoretical development of social work's ecological models, disaster relief, drought, economic development and sustainable livelihoods, environmental and ecological justice, ecological awareness, environmental education, deep ecology, land use, fossil fuels, greenhouse gas emissions, food security, water contamination, toxic waste, mining and industrial damage, space and place attachment, critiques of social work’s person-in-environment perspective and animal-assisted therapy.

It was once common to hear social workers lament that there were few or no references in the professional literature to social work and environmental concerns. While perhaps once the case, the explosion of publications over the last ten to fifteen years makes that contention no longer tenable.

I cannot claim these references cover the entirety of what may be available in the scholarly literature. I will no doubt have unintentionally overlooked some. I apologize for any oversights. But, if you know of others please e-mail the citation to me and I will be glad to include it in our growing list. If you notice any mistakes (names, dates, etc.) with the citation please let me know and I will correct them.  I want to thank Dr. John Coates and Dr. Mel Gray for their efforts in helping to compile this list. I am also indebted to Dr. Mary Rogge and Dr. Maria Hoff for their earlier efforts to develop a list of social workers writing about environmental concerns. I hope you find it helpful to your work.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Abrams, L. (2009). Preview: My dog is my co-therapist. Reflections: Narratives of Professional Helping, 15(1), 52-58.

Addams, J. (1904). Neighborhood improvement. Proceedings of the National Conference of Charities and Correction. New York: Fred J. Heer Press.

Agoramoorthy, G. & Hsu, M. J. (2008). Reviving India's grassroots social work for sustainable development. International Social Work, 51(4), 544-555.

Agrawal, A., Yadama, G.N., Andrade, R., & Bhattacharya, A. (under review). Decentralization, women’s participation, and environmental conservation: The Joint Forest Management Program in Madhya Pradesh, India. World Development.

Agrawal, A. & Yadama, G.N. (1997). How do local institutions mediate market and population pressures on resources? Forest Panchayats in Kumaon, India. Development and Change, 28(3), 435-465.

Alston, M. (2009). Drought policy in Australia: Gender mainstreaming or gender blindness? Gender, Place & Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, 16(2), 139-154.

Alston, M. (2007). It's really not easy to get help: Services to drought-affected families. Australian Social Work , 60 (4), 421-435.

Alston, M., & Besthorn, F. H. (in press). Environment and Sustainability. Sage International Social Work Handbook. London: Sage Publications.

Anstey, B.E. (1989). Health in a high-tech society: Pesticide poisoning. International Social Work, 32(2), 193-194.

Austin, D. (2010). Confronting environmental challenges on the US-Mexico border: Long-term community-based research and community service learning in a binational partnership. Journal of Community Practice, 18(2-3), 361-395.

Bach, C. (2008). “His ears are so soft!” Vetpets: An animal-assisted visitation/activity program for children and families at the Philadelphia Ronald McDonald house. Reflections: Narrative of Professional Helping, 14(4), 39-45.

Bartlett, M. (2000, July). Teaching social work and environmentalism. Paper presented at the joint meeting of the International Federation of Social Workers and the International Association of Schools of Social Work, Montreal, Canada.

Bartlett, M. (2003). Two movements that have shaped a nation: A course in the convergence of professional values and environmental struggles. Critical Social Work, 4(1). Retrieved from http://www.uwindsor.ca/criticalsocialwork/

Baschiera, D.C. (2009). Climate change and the new humanitarianism. Paper presented atthe 20th Asia Pacific Social Work Conference, Sky City Auckland Convention Centre, Auckland, New Zealand, 11-13 November 2009.

Becker, S.M. (1997). Psychosocial assistance after environmental accidents: A policy perspective. Environmental Health Perspectives, 105(6), 1557-1563.

Benedict, J. (2001, July). Healing ourselves, healing the earth. Paper presentation at the First Annual Symposium of the Global Alliance for a Deep Ecological Social Work, Deepening Earth Consciousness in Social Work, 2001, Washington, D.C.

Berger, R. (1995). Habitat destruction syndrome. Social Work, 40(2), 441-443.

Berger, R. (2006). Using contact with nature, creativity and rituals as a therapeutic medium with children with learning difficulties: A case study. Emotional and, 11(2), 135-146

Berger, R., & Kelly, J. (1993). Social work in the ecological crisis. Social Work, 38, 521-526.

Berger, R., & McLeod, J. (2006). Incorporating nature into therapy: A framework for practice. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 25(2), 80-94.

Berlin, S.B. (1996). Constructivism and the environment: A cognitive-integrative perspective for social work practice. Families in Society, 77, 326-335.

Besthorn, F. H. (in press). Radical egalitarian ecological justice: A social work call to action. In M. Gray, & J. Coates (Eds.), Environmental Social Work (chapter 1). London: Routledge.

Besthorn, F. H. (in press). Speaking earth: Environmental restoration and restorative justice. In K. van Wormer, & L. Walker (Eds.). Restorative Justice Today (chapter 8). London: Sage Publications.

Besthorn, F. H. (in press). Deep Ecology’s contribution to social work: A ten-year retrospective. International Journal of Social Work.

Besthorn, F.H. (2008). Environment and social work practice. Encyclopedia of Social Work (vol. 2). (20th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. 132-136.

Besthorn, F. H. (2008). The environmental restoration movement as an issue of justice. In K. van Wormer (Ed.). Restorative justice across the east and west. Hong Kong: Casa Verde Publishing. 205-229.

Besthorn, F. H. (2007). Envoicing the world: Constructionism and essentialism in natural discourse—how social work fits in.In S. Witkin & Saleebey, D. (eds.). Social Work Dialogues: Transforming the Canon in Inquiry, Practice and Education. Alexandria, VA: CSWE Press. 167-202

Besthorn, F. H. (2007). Insights on deep ecology from Norway. In K. vanWormer, F. H. Besthorn and T. Keefe, Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Groups, Communities and Organizations (pp. 243-245). New York: Oxford University Press.

Besthorn, F.H. (2006). Instructional techniques for social work education: Insights from deep ecology in its Norwegian cultural context. Universitas: On-line Journal of Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity, 2(1), 1-18. Retrieved from
http://www.grad.uni.edu/information/newsitem.aspx?NewsId=113

Besthorn, F. H. (2006). Globalized consumer culture: Implications for social justice and practice teaching (pp. 142-160). In G. Ixer (ed.), Practice learning perspectives on globalisation, citizenship and cultural change. London: Whiting & Birch Press.

Besthorn, F.H. (2004). Beetles, bullfrogs and butterflies: Contributions of the natural environment to childhood development and resilience. In M. Ungar (ed.). Pathways to resilience: A handbook of theories, method and interventions (pp. 106-127). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Besthorn, F.H. (2004). Globalized consumer culture: Its implications for social justice and practice teaching in social work. Journal of Practice Teaching in Health and Social Work, 5(3), 20-39.

Besthorn, F.H. (2004). Restorative justice and environmental restoration: Twin pillars of a just global environmental policy: Hearing the voice of the victim. Journal of Social and Societal Policy, 3(2), 33-38.

Besthorn, F.H. (2003). Radical ecologisms: Insights for educating social workers in ecological activism and social justice. Critical Social Work, 4(1), 66-106. Retrieved from http://www.criticalsocialwork.com/CSW_2003_1.html

Besthorn, F.H. (2002). Natural environment and the practice of psychotherapy. Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association, 5(5), 19-22.

Besthorn, F.H. (2002). Expanding spiritual diversity in social work: Perspectives on the greening of spirituality. Currents: New Scholarship in the Human Services, 1(1). Retrieved from
http://fsw.ucalgary.ca/currents/fred_besthorn/besthorn.htm

Besthorn, F.H. (2002). Radical environmentalism and the ecological self: Rethinking the concept of self-identity for social work practice. Journal of Progressive Human Services, 13(1), 53-72.

Besthorn, F.H. (2002). Is it time for a new ecological approach to social work: What is the environment telling us?The Spirituality and Social Work Forum, 9(1), 2-5.

Besthorn, F.H. (2001). Transpersonal psychology and deep ecological philosophy: Exploring linkages and applications for social work.Social Thought: Journal of Religion in the Social Services, 22(1/2), 23-44.

Besthorn, F.H. (2001). The greening of spirituality: History and trends in a new earth story for social work theory and practice. Paper presented at the Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education, 2001 Conference, Dallas, Texas.

Besthorn, F. H. (2001, June). Is it time for a new ecological approach to social work: What is the environment telling us? Keynote address at the First Annual Symposium of the Global Alliance for a Deep Ecological Social Work, Deepening Earth Consciousness in Social Work, 2001, Washington, D.C.

Besthorn, F.H. (2001). The biophilia hypothesis: linking biology, natural genetics and spirituality with social work theory and practice. Paper presented at the Annual Program Meeting of the Society for Spirituality and Social Work, 2001 Conference, Washington, D.C.

Besthorn, F. H. (2001). Transpesonal psychology and deep ecological philosophy: Exploring linkages and applications for social work. In E. R. Canda & E. D. Smith (eds.), Transpersonal perspectives on spirituality in social work (pp. 23-44). Binghamton, NY: The Haworth Press.

Besthorn, F.H. (2000). Toward a deep-ecological social work: Its environmental, spiritual and political dimensions. The Spirituality and Social Work Forum, 7(2), 2-7.

Besthorn, F.H. (2000, June). Integrating the divine feminine into whole-earth awareness: Ecofeminist/earth-based spirituality and social work theory and practice. Paper presented at the Annual Program Meeting of the Society for Spirituality and Social Work, 2000 Conference, Lawrence, Kansas.

Besthorn, F.H. (1998). Lessons from nature: Suburban dilemmas. Great Plains Review, 2(1), 51-54.

Besthorn, F.H. (1998). Seeking connections with land and nature: Rural migration and the simple life. In Proceedings of the Sixth Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference.Topeka, KS: Kansas Department of Health and Environment. 50-65.

Besthorn, F.H. (1997). Reconceptualizing social work’s person-in-environment perspective: Explorations in radical environmental thought. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Kansas, Lawrence.

Besthorn, F.H. & Canda, E.R. (2002). Revisioning environment: Deep ecology for education and teaching in social work. Journal of Teaching in Social Work, 22(1/2), 79-101.

Besthorn, F. H. & McMillen, D. P. (2004). The oppression of women and nature: Ecofeminism as a framework for a social justice oriented social work. In J. Schriver, Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Shifting Paradigms in Essential Knowledge for Social Work Practice (4th ed., pp. 98-110). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Besthorn, F.H. & McMillen, D.P. (2002). The oppression of women and nature: Ecofeminism as a framework for a social justice oriented social work. Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 83(3), 221-232.

Besthorn, F. H. & Meyer, E. (2010). Environmentally displaced persons: Broadening social work’s helping imperative. Critical Social Work, 11(3), Retrieved from http://www.uwindsor.ca/criticalsocialwork/

Besthorn, F.H. & Tegtmeier, D. (1999) Opinions/perspectives/beliefs: Nature as professional resource-A new ecological approach to helping. Kansas Chapter NASW News, 24(2), 15.

Besthorn, F.H. & Saleebey, D. (2003). Nature, genetics, and the biophilia connection: Exploring linkages with social work values and practice. Advances in Social Work, 4(1), 1-18.

Besthorn, F.H., Wulff, D., & St. George, S. (2010). Eco-spiritual helping and postmodern therapy: A deeper ecological framework. Journal of Ecopsychology, 2(1), 23-32.

Bohm, P.E. (2005). Environmental issues. In F. J. Turner (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Canadian social work. (pp. 122-123). Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Bolan, R.S. (1994). Environmental quality and social welfare in Poland. In M. Hoff and J. McNutt, (eds). The global environmental crisis: Implications for social welfare and social work. Brookfield, VT: Ashgate. 117-149.

Borrell, J., Lane, S., & Fraser, S. (2010). Integrating environmental issues into social work practice: Lessons learnt from domestic energy auditing. Australian Social Work, 63(3), 315-328.

Bragin, M. (2010). Clinical social work interventions in violence and disaster. In J. Brandell (ed.). Theory and Practice in Clinical Social Work (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, California: Sage.

Bragin, M.  (2007). The effects of war on children: A psychosocial approach. In E. Carll (ed.). Trauma Psychology: Issues in violence, disaster, health and illness. Vol 1:Violence and disaster. Portsmouth New Hampshire: Praeger Greenwood. 125–229.

Brower, A. M. (1988). Can the ecological model guide social work practice? Social Service Review, 62(3), 411-429.

Bruck, L. (1999). Bringing life to the facility. Nursing Homes, 48(10), 57-58.

Brueckner, M. & Ross, D. (2010-forthcoming). Under corporate skies: The struggle between people, place and profit. Fremantle Press. http://www.fremantlepress.com.au/books/1150

Burgon, H. (2011). ‘Queen of the world’: Experiences of at-risk young people participating in equine-assisted learning/therapy. Journal of Social Work Practice, 25(2), 165-183.

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Cahill, M. (1991). The greening of social policy? Social Policy Review, 3(4), 9-23.

Cannan, C. (2000). The environmental crisis, greens and community development. Community Development Journal, 35(4), 365-376.

Carrilio, T.E. (2007). Utilizing a social work perspective to enhance sustainable development efforts in Loreto, Mexico. International Social Work, 50(4), 528-538.

Cataldo, C. (1979). Wilderness therapy: Modern day shamanism. In C.B. Germain (Ed.), Social work practice: People and environments (pp. 46-73). New York: Columbia University Press.

Chan, C. (1993). Grassroots mobilization for environmental protection: Tactics and dilemmas. In C. Chan & P. Hill (Eds.), Limited gains: Grassroots mobilization and the environment in Hong Kong (pp. 15–28). Hong Kong: The Center of Urban Planning and Environmental Management.

Chenoweth, L.I., & Stehlik, D. (2002). Using technology in rural practice: Local area coordination in rural Australia. Rural Social Work, 7 1: 14-21.

Chenoweth, L. & Stehlik, D. (2001). Building resilient communities: Social work practice and rural Queensland. Australian Social Work, 54(2), 47-54.

Churchill, M., Safaouli, J., McCabe, B.W., & Baun, M.M. (1999). Using a therapy dog to alleviate the agitation and desocialisation of people with Alzheimer’s disease. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing & Mental Health Services, 37(4), 16-22.

Clark, E. (2008). NASW takes environmental action. NASW News, 5(9). Retrieved from

http://www.social workers.org/pubs/news/2008/10/clark.asp

Coates, J. (1991). Putting knowledge for practice into perspective. Canadian Social Work Review, 8(1), 82-96.

Coates J. (1999). The ecological crisis: Implications for social work. Unpublished paper. St. Thomas University, Fredericton, NB, Canada.

Coates, J. (2000). From modernism to sustainability: New roles for social work. Paper presentation at the Joint Conference of the International Federation of Social Workers and International Association of Schools of Social Work, Montreal, Quebec Canada.

Coates, J. (2001). Enhancing environmental awareness among social workers. Paper presentation at the First Annual Symposium of the Global Alliance for a Deep Ecological Social Work: Deepening Earth Consciousness in Social Work, Washington, D.C.

Coates, J. (2003). Ecology and social work: Toward a new paradigm. Halifax, NS: Fernwood Books.

Coates, J. (2003). Exploring the roots of the environmental crisis: Opportunity for social transformation. Critical Social Work, 3(1), 44-66.

Coates, J. (2004). From ecology to spirituality and social justice. Currents: New Scholarship in the Human Services, 3(1).

Coates, J. (2005). Environmental crisis: Implications for social work. Journal of Progressive Human Services 16(1), 25-49.

Coates, J. & Besthorn, F.H. (2001). Integrating environmental awareness into social work education. Paper presentation at the First Annual Symposium of the Global Alliance for a Deep Ecological Social Work: Deepening Earth Consciousness in Social Work, Washington, D.C.

Coates J., & Besthorn, F. H. (2010). Building bridges and crossing boundaries: Dialogues in professional helping. Journal of Critical Social Work, 11(3), Retrieved from http://www.uwindsor.ca/criticalsocialwork/

Coates, J., Gray, M., & Hetherington, T. (2006). An ‘Ecospiritual’ perspective: Finally, a place for Indigenous approaches. British Journal of Social Work, 36(3), 381-399.

Coates, J. & Leahy, T. (2006). Ideology and politics: Essential factors in the path toward sustainability. Electronic Green Journal 23.

Coates, J. & McKay, M., (1995). Toward a new pedagogy for social transformation. Journal of Progressive Human Services, 6(1), 27-44.

Coley, R.L., Kuo, F.E., & Sullivan, W.C. (1998). Where does the community grow? The social context created by nature in urban public housing. Environment and Behavior, 29(4), 468-495.

Coulter, M.L., & Noss, C.I. (1998). Preventative social work in perceived environmental disasters. Health and Social Work, 3(4), 296-300.

Cox, D.R. (1998). Community rebuilding in the Philippines: A poverty alleviation program in negros occidental, 1990-1995. In M. D. Hoff (Ed.), Sustainable community development: Studies in economic, environmental, and cultural revitalization (pp.45-62). New York, NY: Lewis Publishers.

Cunningham, R. & Rogge, M. (1992). Social work, oppressed communities and the natural environment: Field education opportunities. Paper presented at the Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education, 1992 Conference, Kansas City.

 

Dawson, S.E. (1992). Navajo uranium workers and the effects of occupational illnesses: A case study. Human Organization: Journal of the Society for Applied Anthropology, 51(4), 389-397.

Dawson, S.E. (1993). Social work practice and technological disasters: The Navajo uranium experience. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 20(2), 5-20.

Dawson, S.E. (1994). Navajo uranium workers and the environment: Technological disaster and survival strategies. In M.D. Hoff & McNutt. J.G. (Eds). The global environmental crisis: Implications for social welfare and social work (150-169). Aldershot: Ashgate.

Dawson, S.E., Charley, P.E., & Harrison, P. (1997). Advocacy and social action among Navajo uranium workers and their families. In T.S. Kerson (Ed.). Social work in health settings: Practice in context (391-407). New York: Haworth Press.

Dawson, S.E., Madsen, G.E., & Spykerman, B.R. (1997). Public health issues concerning American Indian and non-Indian uranium millworkers. Journal of Health & Social Policy, 8(3), 41-56.

Dawson, S.E. & Madsen, G.E. (1995). American Indian uranium millworkers: The perceived effects of chronic occupational exposure. Journal of Health & Social Policy, 7(2), 19-31.

Digges, J. (2009). Human-companion animal social relationships. Reflections: Narratives of Professional Helping, 15(1), 35-41.

De Hoyos, G. (1989). Person-in-environment: A tri-level practice model. Social Casework, 6(2), 129-158.

Dominelli, L. (2010). Globalization, contemporary challenges and social work practice. International Social Work, 53(5), 599-612.

Draper, C., & Freedman, D. (2010). Review and analysis of the benefits, purposes, and motivations associated with community gardening in the United States. Journal of Community Practice, 18(4), 458-492.

Dylan, A.(2009). Environmental social work with groups. Paper presented at the International Conference on Ecology and Professional Helping, Calgary, Alberta.

Dylan, A. (2010). "Three hundred leagues further into the wilderness"-Conceptualizations of the nonhuman during Wendat-French culture contact, 1609-1649: Implications for environmental social work and social justice. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

 

Estes, R. (1993). Toward sustainable development: From theory to praxis. Social Development Issues, 15(3), 1-30.

Fairbanks, R. (2003). A theoretical primer on space. Critical Social Work, 4(1). Retrieved from http://web4.uwindsor.ca/units/socialwork/critical.nsf.

Fairbanks, R. (2003). Blighted spaces and the politics of everyday life. Social Work and Society, 3(1). Retrieved from http://www.socwork.net/2003/1/researchnotes/407.

Faver, C., & Bradley, K. (2009). Preview finding a voice: Animals helping children. Reflections: Narratives of Professional Helping, 15(1), 24-28.

Ferreira, S.B. (2010). Eco-spiritual social work as a precondition for social development. Ethics and Social Welfare, 4(1), 3-23.

Ferris, J. (1991). Green politics and the future of welfare. Social Policy Review, 3(4), 24-42.

Fine, A., & Eisen, C. (2008). A girl and three dogs: Finding the magic in animal-assisted therapy. Reflections: Narratives of Professional Helping, 14(4), 64-71.

Fitzpatrick, T. (1998). The implications of ecological thought for social welfare. Critical Social Policy, 18, 5-26.

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Galindo, E. (2006). Integrated management of hydro resources: Tools to ensure urban environmental sustainability. Social Development Issues, 28(3), 87-100.

Gamble, D.N. & Varnam S. (1999). International women doing development work define need skills for sustainable development. Social Development Issues, 21(1), 47-56.

Geist, T. (2011). Conceptual framework for animal assisted therapy. Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal, 28(3), 243-256.

Germain, C.B. (1973). An ecological perspective in casework practice. Social Casework, 54(6), 323-330.

Germain, C.B. (1976). Time: An ecological variable in social work practice. Social Casework, 57(7), 419-426.

Germain, C.B. (1978a). General-systems theory and ego psychology: An ecological perspective. Social Service Review, 52(4), 535-550.

Germain, C.B. (1978b). Space: An ecological variable in social work practice. Social casework, 59(9), 419-426.

Germain, C.B. (ed.). (1979). Social work practice: People and environments, an ecological perspective. New York: Columbia University Press.

Germain, C.B. (1979). Introduction: Ecology and social work. In C.B. Germain (ed.). Social work practice: People and environments, an ecological perspective. New York: Columbia University Press. 3-22.

Germain, C.B. (1980). Social context of clinical social work. Social Work, 25(6), 483-488.

Germain, C.B. (1981a). The ecological approach to people-environment transactions. Social Casework, 62(6), 323-331.

Germain, C.B. (1981b). The physical environment in social work practice. In A.N. Maluccio (ed.). Promoting competence in clients: A new/old approach to social work practice. New York: Free Press. 103-124.

Germain, C.B. (1983). Using social and physical environments. In A. Rosenblatt & Waldfogel, D. (eds). Handbook of clinical social work. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. 110-133.

Germain, C.B. (1991). Social work practice: People and environments: An ecological perspective. New York: Columbia University Press.

Germain, C.B. (1991). Human behavior in the social environment: An ecological view. New York: Columbia University Press.

Germain, C.B., & Gitterman, A. (1980). The life model of social work practice. New York: Columbia University Press.

Germain, C.B., & Gitterman, A. (1987). Ecological perspective. In NASW (ed.). Encyclopedia of Social Work. Silver Spring, MD: National Association of Social Workers. 488-499.

Germain, C.B., & Gitterman, A . (1995). Ecological perspective. In NASW (ed.). Encyclopedia of Social Work (19th ed.). Washington DC: National Association of Social Workers Press. 816-824.

Germain, C.B., & Gitterman, A. (1996). The life model of social work practice: Advances in theory and practice (2nd ed.). New York: Columbia University Press.

Giroult, E. (1990). Health aspects of housing and town planning. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 17(1), 5-24.

Gitterman, A. (2011). Advances in the life model of social work education. In F. Turner (Ed.), Social work treatment: Interlocking therapeutic approaches (pp. 279-292). New York: Oxford University Press.

Gitterman, A., & Germain, C. B. (1976). Social work practice: A life model. Social Service Review, 50(4), 601-610.

Goldstein, G., Novick, R., & Schaefer, M. (1990). Housing health and well-being: an international perspective. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 17(1), 161-181.

Gould, K.H. (1983). Life model versus conflict model: A feminist perspective. Social Work, 32, 181-185.

Gray, M., Coates, J., & Hetherington, T. (2007). Hearing indigenous voices in mainstream social work. Families in Society-Journal of Contemporary Social Services, 88(1), 55-66.

Green, D., & McDermott, F. (2010). Social work from inside and between complex systems: Perspectives on person-in-environment for today’s social work. British Journal of Social Work, 40(8), 2414-2430.

Greif, G. L. (2003). In response to Michael Ungar’s “A deeper, more social ecological social work practice.” [Review]. Social Service Review,77(2), 306-308.

Grinnell, R.M. (1973). Environmental modification: A casework’s concern or casework’s neglect. Social Service Review, 47(2), 208-220.

Gutheil, I. A. (1992). Considering the physical environment: An essential component of good practice. Social Work, 37(5), 391–396.

Gutheil I.A. (1992). Using the agency’s physical environment as a practice tool. Smith College Studies in Social Work, 66, 185-199.

 

Hall, A. (1996). Social work or working for change? Action for grassroots sustainable development in Amazonia. International Social Work, 39(1), 27-39.

Hanrahan, C. (2011). Challenging anthropocentricism in social work through ethics and spirituality: Lessons from studies in human-animal bonds. Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work, 30(3), 272-293.

Hashimi, J.K. (1981). Environmental modification: Teaching social coping skills. Social Work, 26(4), 323-326.

Hawkins, C. (2010). Sustainability, human rights, and environmental justice: Critical connections for contemporary social work. Critical Social Work, 11(3), 68-81.

Hawkins, C., & Rao, P. (2008). A social development response to the tsunami recovery in Tamil Nadu, India. Social Development Issues, 30(1), 29-46.

Hawkins, R.L. & Maurer, K. (Advance Access). Bonding, bridging and linking: How social capital operated in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. British Journal of Social Work. Advance Access published on August 3, 2009.

Hawkins, R.L. (in press). Same as it ever was, only worse: Negative life events and poverty among New Orleans Katrina survivors. Families in Society.

Hillman, M. (2002). Environmental justice: A crucial link between environmentalism and community development? Community Development Journal, 37(4), 349-360.

Hearn, G. (Ed.). (1969). The general systems approach: Contributions toward an holistic conception of social work. New York: Council on Social Work Education.

Hoff, M.D. (1992). Integrating global environmental issues into the social work curriculum. Paper presentation at the Annual Meeting of the International Association of Schools of Social Work, 1992 Conference, Washington, D.C.

Hoff, M.D. (1994). Environmental foundations of social welfare: Theoretical resources. In M. Hoff & McNutt, J. (Eds). The global environmental crisis: Implications for social welfare and social work (pp. 12-35). Brookfield, VT: Ashgate.

Hoff, M.D. (1996). Poverty, environmental decline and intergroup violence: An exploration of the linkages. In J.S. Ismael (ed.). International social welfare in a changing world (pp. 167-183). Calgary: Detseling Enterprise, Ltd. Press.

Hoff, M.D. (1996). Poverty, environmental decline and intergroup violence: An exploration of the linkages. In J.S. Ismael (Ed.). International social welfare in a changing world. 167-183. Calgary, Alberta: Detseling Enterprise, Ltd. Press.

Hoff, M.D. (1997). Social work, the environment and sustainable development. In M.C. Hokenstad & J. Midgley (eds). Issues in international social work: Global challenges for a new century (27-44). Washington, DC: NASW Press.

Hoff, M.D. (ed.). (1998). Sustainable community development: Studies in environmental, economic and cultural revitalization. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, Lewis Publishers.

Hoff, M.D. (ed.). (1998). Sustainable community development: Studies in environmental, economic and cultural revitalization. CRC Press/Lewis Publishers [Chapter 10. Sustainable community development: Origins and essential elements of a new approach (Study Guide). The Willapa Alliance: The role of a voluntary organization in fostering regional action for sustainability. Conclusion: Common themes and replicable strategies].

Hoff, M.D. & Hodne, C.J. (1994). Supporting women in rural development: An international comparison of issues and findings. Social Development Issues, 16(1), 33-40.

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